In the midst of COVID 19,  The Foundation for Black Heritage and Culture is committed to enhancing health and the well-being of individuals and families in the community by sponsoring coronavirus tests, health screenings, Podcasts, workshops and seminars. 

WHAT IS COMMUNITY HEALTH?

Community health is the collective well-being of community members. In addition to living in the same neighborhood or region, these populations often share health characteristics, ethnicities, and socioeconomic conditions.

For instance, some low-income communities might experience high obesity rates due to limited availability of nutritious foods in local grocery stores. This places them in an area commonly known as a food desert.

In addition, a population might be exposed to contaminants from a nearby plant or waste facility. Community health programs improve access to preventive health care services, engage citizens in care decisions, and seek out lower medical costs.

WHY COMMUNTY HEALTH IS IMPORTANT 
About half of Americans suffer from chronic health conditions. Many do not get proper care due to socioeconomic factors beyond their control. An elderly diabetic without a driver’s license and no family nearby, a pregnant woman with toxemia living more than 50 miles from a hospital—both are at high risk in a medical emergency. This makes community health resources all the more important.

TEXAS RANKED LAST IN HEALTHCARE COVERAGE – VIEW REPORT

ADDRESSING HEALTH DISPARITIES Healthcare disparities can be especially prevalent in rural and low-income communities where hospitals have closed down and physician shortages exist. More than 7,000 primary care, 6,000 dental, and 5,500 mental health shortage areas currently exist in the U.S., according to the Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA).These populations may be exposed to higher levels of poverty, homelessness, substance abuse, and other risk factors. When a community health system that takes the community’s unique characteristics into account is put into place to address unmet needs, the community’s overall quality of care can be vastly improved.

Our Programs – Black Heritage Health Fair

Program Description 

Take Control Mind, Body, and Soul!  Black Heritage Health Fair will offer onsite screenings for prevalent chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, breast cancer, glaucoma, etc. 

Need for Service

National Urban League research revealed that Houston black households earn $40,129 compared to the $75,201 earned by white households. A Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study found that education matters to economic and health outcomes because: (1) education creates opportunities for better health; (2) poor health puts education attainment at risk; and (3) certain conditions affect both health and education. This research is supported by the fact that wonder.cdc.gov indicates, of the 810,903 African Americans that resided in Harris County, Texas between 1999 and 2010, 1,200 died from diseases of the heart; 194 died from diabetes mellitus; 158 died from HIV/AIDS; 84 died from essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease; and 58 died from chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Statistics confirm that blacks died from these treatable chronic health conditions at higher rates than other racial and ethnic group. 

Approach/Methodology 

The Festival will offer: (1) onsite health screenings for prevalent chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, breast cancer, glaucoma, etc.; (2) physical fitness marathons by age group; (3) nutrition education; (4) meal planning; and (5) healthy cooking demonstrations for adults and children. Vouchers for kids’ cook books will be distributed through a corporate partner after the event. 

Goals, Objectives, Outcomes & Performance Measures 

The goal is to provide Festival attendees with the education they need to create opportunities for better health. The objectives are that within 60 days after the festival: (1) 65% of the attendees diagnosed with chronic diseases will seek medical care; (2)75% of the families will have prepared a 7-Day meal plan; (3) 75% of families will report preparing one or more of the meals prepared during demonstrations; (4) 80% of kids’ cookbook vouchers will be redeemed; and 65% of attendees will complete surveys 60 days after the event that measure their utilization of the strategies shared. Evaluation will involve administering pre-surveys before the education and post-surveys after the interventions to measure levels of increased awareness concerning topics discussed. The expected outcome is that Festival attendees will take ownership for their health by living healthier lifestyles that will reduce the overall cost of hospitalizations in Harris County for treatable, chronic disease-related conditions. 

Sustainability Strategy 

The Foundation will establish relationships with community health care providers, nutritionist and a local grocer that will provide assistance annually. 

Support Needed

  • Cash donations, pledges and in-kind donations of services and /or products
  • Community health care providers to educate and conduct screenings
  • Nutritionists to provide nutrition and meal planning education
  • Local grocers to donate bags of groceries with supplies for one adult and on child’s meal demonstrated during the festival
  • Corporate sponsor willing to donate/purchase 1,500 Betty Crocker “Kids Can Cook” cookbooks to be redeemed by attendees at local retailers
  • Volunteers to distribute and college evaluation surveys. 
© 2024 Foundation for Black Heritage and Culture